Question about The/The Comparatives

In the Question Time series, we discuss your language-related questions and problems.

I have a question about one of the structures used in the English language.

Here is the structure:

The comparative adjective, the comparative adjective

For example:

  • The older we grow, the wiser we become.
  • The higher you climb, the colder it gets.
  • He spent a year in India and loves spicy food. The hotter the food is, the more he likes it.

My question is whether we can use this structure with one verb or even without verbs?

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Maryse D
Explorer
Learner
8 years ago

I think the structure you used in your three examples is not correct. I should tell you that you have to put a verb in the first part of your sentences. That seems to me necessary but I’m sure that Pejman will give us THE answer!!!

Blandine L
Senior
Active Learner
Learner
8 years ago

I think we need help from our favourite teacher! ;-)

But I think I would rather write:
Butter gives a good taste to your cooking. The higher amount of butter, the more delicious your dish is.

I don’t use this structure very often, I need the Pejman’s lights!

Blandine L
Senior
Active Learner
Learner
8 years ago

Some good Pejman’s insights is the best to help us not memorise errors…

P H
8 years ago

My answer to Delârâm’s question is: Yes, you can… but! What I want to say is: The omission of the verb is always a possibility, in this and in other structures, but it should be done in a way which keeps the meaning clear and which sounds natural to a native speaker. Here are some examples: The more you practice, the more fluent you’ll get. The more you practice, the more fluent. (This doesn’t sound quite right to me.) The more you practice, the better your fluency. The more, the better! The bigger your dreams are, the higher you’ll get… Read more »

Blandine L
Senior
Active Learner
Learner
8 years ago

I ignored the expression “that leaves no room for question” but I like it and I am sure I will use it more than the comparatives which remains a way to speak which is not evident for me.

P H
7 years ago

For Blandine’s (and our other French members’) attention:

The verb “ignore” is a false friend for speakers of French.

I suggest you have a look at the meaning and the examples here.

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